Team: Cornell Hack4Impact (Designers: Connie & Ishika, Developers: Shefali, Steve, Anika, Jiwoo, Amy, Tech Lead: Anusha, Project Manager: Priya)
Timeline:
Fall 2020 (6 weeks Design, 10 weeks overall)

The Problem

There is a huge lack of transparency about conditions inside prisons and three supreme court cases (Branzburg v. Hayes, Pell v. Procunier, and Saxby v. Washington Post Co.) make it difficult for journalists to access these prisons.

Currently, the Correctional Association of New York (CANY) is the only organization with access to that data. …


by Connie Liu, Google Summer of Code 2020

mentored by by Joey Lee and Yining Shi

2020 marks the Processing Foundation’s ninth year participating in Google Summer of Code, where we work with students on open-source projects that range from software development to community outreach. We’ve been posting articles written by some of the GSoC students, explaining their projects in detail, which you can read here. The series will conclude with a wrap-up post of all the work done by this year’s cohort.

A gif of the 2020 showcase page that transitions through the data visualizations to the actual gallery page.
A gif of the 2020 showcase page that transitions through the data visualizations to the actual gallery page.
Connie Liu worked on the p5.js Showcase, adding tags and implementing translations for Spanish and Chinese, among other things. “I’m an upcoming sophomore at Cornell University, pursuing a major in Information Science (with a concentration in User Experience and Interactive Technologies) and a minor in Computer Science. I hope to one day be a creative technologist. p5.js was what first opened my eyes to the world of creative coding. It’s my first time contributing to open source with Google Summer of Code and I’m beyond excited to contribute to the p5.js Showcase. Portfolio Website and Linkedin.”

When I learned I was selected to be a GSoC student for p5.js I was absolutely ecstatic. p5.js has always held a special part of…


Three iphone screens, left is the home page for groups, center is the details for groups, and right is how to search groups
Three iphone screens, left is the home page for groups, center is the details for groups, and right is how to search groups

Unlike Instagram and Facebook, Twitter is a social media platform where interacting mostly means connecting and in many cases with strangers. There are so many different forms of connection on Twitter from designers networking to fandoms raving about the latest song.

But a huge problem with the platform happens when your audience is a mix of these people with different interests. Who do you post to? Is it a good idea to post about the newest Harry Styles album if your audience is mostly professionals?

Instead of being afraid to tweet because of conflicting audiences, is there a better solution?

Connie Liu

creating at Cornell, find me @conliuart on Twitter and connieliu0.github.io! Currently @GSOC

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